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Photovoice

PhotoVoice

PhotoVoice is a school-based project that trains learners to use photography and writing to chronicle their daily lives, provides a look at the community through its children’s eyes.

With support from UNICEF, Sonke has been working in KwaZulu-Natal and the Eastern Cape since late 2006 to promote greater involvement by men in meeting the needs of children affected by HIV and AIDS. Alongside community education and capacity building for local partners, Sonke has used PhotoVoice to help children convey their experiences, needs and aspirations and to mobilize adults — and especially men — to meet their needs.

PhotoVoice’s Aims

The PhotoVoice Project aims to:

  • Increase the health and safety of participants by increasing their awareness about gender-based violence and HIV/AIDS.
  • Challenge men in the community, especially traditional and religious leaders, to change attitudes and practices related to gender and HIV/AIDS leading to increased child protection and care.
  • Equip participants with basic photography knowledge and practical skills. Build confidence and self-esteem through gaining new skills.
  • Develop a sense of agency through training children to become authors of their own stories and experiences.
  • Foster leadership skills through enrolling students in peer educator programs at their respective schools.

What are the issues?

In South Africa, gender inequality and HIV/AIDS continue to impede youth and child development in dramatic ways. All too often gender roles and expectations condone male violence against women and girls, grant young and adult men the power to initiate and dictate the terms of sex, and make it extremely difficult for women and girls to protect themselves from either HIV or violence.

Hence, men have a critical role to play in meeting the needs of orphans and vulnerable children. As of 2002, “55% of rural African children had absent fathers” and “a further 12.5% had fathers who were deceased”. AIDS has added an enormous strain to this already fragile situation and heightened children’s vulnerability to illness, malnutrition, abuse and neglect. This, in turn, has made the involvement of men in the lives of children all the more urgent.

But it is not only as fathers and members of the extended family that men have a crucial role to play in the lives of children. Men still make up the majority of community leaders, including local government officials, traditional, and religious leaders, and as such wield power and control resources in rural South Africa thus placing them in a unique position to protect children from violence, and ensure that they access existing protection and welfare mechanisms and services.

Engaging the Community through PhotoVoice

Sonke has used the PhotoVoice process as both a research tool and as a way of generating educational materials to support and reinforce its work with men in these areas. A review and analysis of the children’s photographs and writings from both communities reveal that child safety, gender, and poor service delivery — especially issues related to litter, sanitation and running water — are common themes.

To date, the PhotoVoice project has worked well to expose communities to the issues of its children and has increased the visibility of children throughout these areas. In doing so, PhotoVoice has created opportunities for dialogue about the daily challenges of children. It is through these conversations that social norms are shifted and communities move into action.

Text Search
Themes
Programmes
http://www.genderjustice.org.za/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/Sonke-photo-essay-on-PV-in-Agenda-May-2009-2-wpcf_160x200.jpg
20 December 2010
http://www.genderjustice.org.za/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/PhotoVoiceBook-Two-Rural-Communities-wpcf_160x200.jpg
Sonke Gender Justice Network’s Fatherhood and Child Security Project
20 March 2010
http://www.genderjustice.org.za/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/Photovoice-posters-Mhlontlo-and-Nkandla-Draft-1-wpcf_160x200.jpg
20 December 2008
http://www.genderjustice.org.za/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/PhotoVoiceBook-Nkandla-wpcf_160x200.jpg
20 December 2006

MEDIA STATEMENT – APRIL 24, 2015 – FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

On Freedom Day (April 27th), Sonke calls on South Africans and our government to stand up for equality, freedom and democracy

Sonke Gender Justice (“Sonke”) joins millions of South Africans condemning the xenophobic violence that has taken place regularly in South Africa during the past decade. We call on our government to take decisive action now, and to ensure that all of those perpetrating violent crimes in our country are held accountable for their crimes. We also call on all of those who have made discriminatory or xenophobic comments, especially members of government and the Zulu king, Goodwill Zwelithini, to unreservedly apologise for their incendiary remarks, and to be held accountable for their role in the current violence experienced by foreign nationals in South Africa, including being held accountable by the South African Human Rights Commission (SAHRC).

We call on the South African Presidency, and President Zuma himself, to publicly request that Zwelithini withdraw and apologise for his harmful remarks in which he told foreigners to return to their countries, knowing full well that he made those statements in a country rife with xenophobia and xenophobic violence, and that he desist from blaming the media or "third forces".

Following recent and impressive nationwide protests against xenophobia, including a massive march by civil society in Johannesburg this week, we remind our leaders that our democracy was established upon ideals of equality, non discrimination and freedom, and that South Africans will not sit quietly while some attempt to destroy the foundations of a free and equal South Africa.

We condemn violence, and in particular violent acts flowing from prejudice and hate. We therefore call on the government to develop sustainable structures to protect all who live in South Africa. We call on government and civil society to increase the investment in containing the current violence, and to put long-term measures in place to prevent and address violence and hostility, particularly by addressing the underlying causes of xenophobia such as endemic poverty, inequality, unemployment and pervasive generalised violence by promoting social cohesion and by fostering a culture of respect for human rights and the law. We at Sonke commit ourselves to expanding our work to end discrimination, stigma and violence in the communities in which we work in South Africa.

We also call on President Zuma and government to address violence generally in South Africa, reminding them of the high levels of murder, gender-based violence and violent crime. “South Africa has a deeply violent history and that continues to play out in our society today, at great harm to our people - through crime, gender-based violence and xenophobia,” says Czerina Patel, Sonke’s Communications Manager, “The experience of violence, both historical and current, is eating away at our social fabric, and is literally killing our people. We need to work to reduce violence everywhere, and we are again reiterating our demand to President Zuma and Minister Shabangu to urgently develop a funded national strategic plan to end gender-based violence which must include broad violence prevention strategies in communities throughout South Africa.”

Foreign nationals in South Africa are being used as scapegoats for widespread economic problems in South Africa that are not their fault; and which will continue to exist whether or not foreign nationals reside in South Africa unless the government responds properly and massively improves service delivery.

Government is failing at providing quality education, creating jobs and getting people out of poverty. “The real enemy to South Africa is corruption and nepotism,” says Patel, “If individuals in government spent less effort looking for ways to enrich themselves and to garner power and money for themselves and their families, more resources would be directed towards the improvement of South Africans' lives; If government put South Africans’ best interests ahead of political interests, we’d have a stronger leadership, one which would be better equipped to deal with the huge challenges of building a new democracy and creating economic opportunity for the poor. Right now, the poor are being left out, and South Africa has become the most unequal country in the world. This has little to nothing to do with African migrants in South Africa, and has everything to do with the failures on the part of our government to govern.”

We invite South Africans and anyone who believes in equality to join us in our advocacy to call for long-term measures to build social cohesion, fight xenophobia and violence, and strengthen democracy, and to march with us for social justice, including in a march this Monday: On Freedom Day, April 27, 2015, we will stand up for democracy, human dignity and a violence-free South Africa and march against xenophobia, afrophobia and all discrimination, rejecting the brutal discrimination of the Apartheid government of the past.

###

March details:
When: Monday 27th April, 11h00
Where: Town Two Khayelitsha, corner Spine Rd and Jeff Masemola, marching to Site C
[March organized by Equal Education, Treatment Action Campaign, Ndifuni Ukwazi, Social Justice Coalition and Sonke Gender Justice]

[If you can’t join us in Khayelitsha, there will also be a smaller march against xenophobia in Mfuleni (organised by Sonke’s MenCare team), leaving Mfuleni High School at 10am on Monday, April 27, 2015. Call Thulani Velebayi for more details: 060-492-5739]

Media Contact:
Czerina Patel, Sonke Communications Manager
021-423-7088
czerina@genderjustice.org.za
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Sonke's prisons work is featured in an article on the violation of health rights in South African prisons in the Mail and Guardian.
http://mg.co.za/article/2015-04-23-prisoners-health-rights-routinely-violated-in-sas-jails
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MONDAY, APRIL 27 - #FREEDOMDAY - STAND UP AGAINST #XENOPHOBIA and #AFROPHOBIA

MONDAY IS FREEDOM DAY - AND WHAT BETTER A DAY TO STAND UP FOR FREEDOM, EQUALITY, DEMOCRACY, HUMAN DIGNITY, AND A VIOLENT-FREE SOUTH AFRICA, AND AGAINST XENOPHOBIA, AFROPHOBIA AND DISCRIMINATION ?!

LET'S REMEMBER THAT THE OPPRESSIVE APARTHEID REGIME DISCRIMINATED AGAINST AFRICAN PEOPLE, AND THAT THOSE DAYS IN SOUTH AFRICA, WHERE BLACK PEOPLE WERE UNSAFE AND UNDER THREAT, SHOULD HAVE NEVER EXISTED, AND CERTAINLY SHOULD NOT EXIST IN A POST-APARTHEID DEMOCRATIC AND FREE SOUTH AFRICA, BUILT ON THE FOUNDATIONS OF EQUALITY AND NON-DISCRIMINATION!

Stand up against #Xenophobia #Afrophobia and #violence at a march in Khayelitsha organised by Sonke Gender Justice and our partners Equal Education, Ndifuna Ukwazi Treatment Action Campaign and the Social Justice Coalition

Monday 27 April - FREEDOM DAY, 11am
Meeting : Town 2, Corner Spine Road & Jeff Mosemola Road
Khayelitsha - 11am
March goes to Site C in Khayelitsha!

Let's celebrate and stand up for freedom, democracy, unity, ubuntu and equality!

Please spread the word and hope to see you there, standing up for fellow human beings and a South Africa based on equality, respect and humanity, which rejects the barbaric and hateful ways of the old Apartheid regime.

[CP]
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MONDAY, APRIL 27 - FREEDOM DAY - STAND UP AGAINST #XENOPHOBIA and #AFROPHOBIA

MONDAY IS FREEDOM DAY - AND WHAT BETTER A DAY TO STAND UP FOR FREEDOM, EQUALITY, DEMOCRACY AND HUMAN DIGNITY, AND AGAINST XENOPHOBIA AND AFROPHOBIA, REMEMBERING THAT THE OPPRESSIVE APARTHEID REGIME DISCRIMINATED AGAINST AFRICAN PEOPLE, AND THAT THOSE DAYS IN SOUTH AFRICA, WHERE BLACK PEOPLE WERE UNSAFE AND UNDER THREAT, SHOULD HAVE NEVER EXISTED, AND CERTAINLY SHOULD NOT EXIST IN A POST-APARTHEID DEMOCRATIC SOUTH AFRICA?!

Stand up against #Xenophobia at a march in Khayelitsha organised by Equal Education Treatment Action Campaign Ndifuna Ukwazi, Social Justice Coalition and Sonke Gender Justice :

Monday 27 April - FREEDOM DAY (Let's celebrate and stand for freedom, democracy and equality)
11am
Town 2, Corner Spine Road & Jeff Mosemola Road
Khayelitsha
March goes to Site C in Khayelitsha!

Please spread the word and hope to see you there standing up for fellow human beings and a South Africa based on equality, respect and humanity, rejecting the ways of the old Apartheid regime.

[CP] (2 photos)
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Sonke Gender Justice updated their cover photo. ... See MoreSee Less

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